Why The Film Is A Documentary

Why The Film Is A Documentary

The Rising Tide is a documentary film made in 1949. It was directed by Jean Palardy. The documentary depicts how cooperatives in the wartime regions inspired new energy and promise to impoverished fishermen. For example, one fishermen named Willie Leblanc had risen from the hungry, desperate years of the 1920s depression to greater times. It is a movie about hopes and dreams and succeeding through hardships. Furthermore, it shows how human beings have achieved great things despite immense obstacles and difficulties that arise in life. The New York Times has this film databased on their website. In fact, The Rising Tide was nominated for an Academy Award. The category for nomination was Best Documentary Short. The film was produced by James Beveridge and the sound-score was created by Robert Fleming. Although this movie is very short it hits hard and is a very powerful and inspiring documentary. It goes to show how powerful something can be as a simple and concise rendering of cinematic expression. The art of filmmaking is a difficult business, but for a film in 1949 to depict such struggle, persistence, and determination was aimed at society in general. In other words, it was a film to show society how to recover from war and how to trudge forward like the fisherman themselves in the movie.

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